Author Topic: M  (Read 1891 times)

hal9g

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M
« on: July 21, 2010, 12:02:34 AM »


Title: M: The Criterion Collection
Year: 1931
Director: Fritz Lang
Rating: NR
Length: 110 Min.
Video: Full Frame 1.33:1
Audio: German: Dolby Digital: Mono, Commentary: Dolby Digital: Mono
Subtitles: English

Stars:
Peter Lorre
Ellen Widmann
Inge Landgut
Otto Wernicke
Theodor Loos

Plot:
A simple, haunting phrase whistled off-screen tells us that a young girl will be killed. “Who is the murderer?” pleads a nearby placard as serial killer Hans Beckert (Peter Lorre) closes in on little Elsie Beckmann. In his harrowing masterwork M, Fritz Lang merges trenchant social commentary with chilling suspense, creating a panorama of private madness and public hysteria that to this day remains the blueprint for the psychological thriller. The Criterion Collection is proud to present a new restoration of this landmark film.

Extras:
Scene Access
Audio Commentary
Featurettes
Gallery
Production Notes
Claude Chabrol’s "M le maudit"

My Thoughts:
This is a suspense thriller about a child serial killer that eerily portends a future where this behavior becomes all too common, and the debate over the insanity plea is far ahead of its time.
This movie was riveting from beginning to end and used some interesting techniques where a narrator recited parts of the story while the camera showed “clips” of action being described.  There was also an interesting section with no sound, but just a series of video clips giving the observer a glimpse of what the city was going through.
Peter Lorre gives an extremely powerful performance during the “citizen’s trial”.
A poignant movie with a closing message that is just as true, if not truer, today than it was when it was given in 1931

Rating:

Najemikon

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Re: M
« Reply #1 on: July 21, 2010, 12:40:38 AM »
 :clap:

Nice to see someone else having a crack at this. It was my first entry for the "Alphathon"; I thought a single letter was quite apt.

What was the Criterion edition like? Mine was a UK Eureka "Masters of Cinema" release and it is superb.

Offline Antares

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Re: M
« Reply #2 on: July 21, 2010, 01:13:44 AM »
You'll never hear In the Hall of the Mountain King by Edvard Grieg, without thinking of this film from now on.




For me, it was the best film of 1931.

Najemikon

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Re: M
« Reply #3 on: July 21, 2010, 01:19:04 AM »
You remember going to see it?

:tease:

Offline Antares

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Re: M
« Reply #4 on: July 21, 2010, 01:19:52 AM »
Are you sure you're not the bastard son of Benny Hill?  :tease: :hysterical:

Offline Antares

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Re: M
« Reply #5 on: July 21, 2010, 01:36:11 AM »
Here's a good article on Lorre and M and the film in its entirety for those who do not own it.

hal9g

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Re: M
« Reply #6 on: July 21, 2010, 06:41:25 AM »
:clap:

Nice to see someone else having a crack at this. It was my first entry for the "Alphathon"; I thought a single letter was quite apt.

What was the Criterion edition like? Mine was a UK Eureka "Masters of Cinema" release and it is superb.

The transfer was excellent as is the case with almost every Criterion release.  This is a two-disc set.  The first disc has the movie with a commentary track.  The second disc has lots of bonus material including a conversation with Fritz Lang, the short film M le maudit (M, the cursed), interviews, galleries, and more.  Since I'm behind schedule on my marathon, I am putting this aside to watch all the bonus materials until next month, but I'm really looking forward to it.

One thing that I found very odd, was that the film itself contained no credits, whatsoever!   :hmmmm:
« Last Edit: July 21, 2010, 06:47:42 AM by Hal »

hal9g

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Re: M
« Reply #7 on: July 21, 2010, 06:44:15 AM »
You'll never hear In the Hall of the Mountain King by Edvard Grieg, without thinking of this film from now on.

For me, it was the best film of 1931.

Thanks for putting a name to the music.

I know it as the music from Rick Wakeman's "Journey to the Center of the Earth".