Author Topic: Achim's entirely random reviews  (Read 14315 times)

Offline Achim

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Re: Let Me In
« Reply #30 on: October 15, 2010, 04:29:11 AM »
In the AC for the original movie, the director considered the scene to be rather weak, too Hollywood-ish or something like that was his comment. Personally, I liked it too.
I either forgot or missed that particular comment in the AC. I certainly did not find it too Hoolywood-ish at the time. The scene in Let Me In is.

Quote
I remember a particular scene where they either replaced Eli's face with another or used CGI (when she looks up to Oscar after licking the blood from the floor). It had a really creepy effect.
:hmmmm: So it's actually lifted from the original. Don't know, maybe the design was too strong here, maybe they wiped out Moretz's face too much, possibly because it was not creepy but just ugly, but something rubbed me the wrong way here.

I don't like reading subtitles and I don't like dubed movies, so I think I'll wait for the French Canadian remake of this ;D
:hysterical:

Offline goodguy

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Re: Let Me In
« Reply #31 on: October 15, 2010, 05:31:12 AM »
I either forgot or missed that particular comment in the AC.

We may have listened to different ACs. On my German release was an AC in Swedish while the US/UK releases AFAIK had an AC in English.
Matthias

Offline Achim

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Re: Let Me In
« Reply #32 on: October 15, 2010, 06:30:52 AM »
We may have listened to different ACs. On my German release was an AC in Swedish while the US/UK releases AFAIK had an AC in English.
Ah, that's it then. I have the UK release (well, technically I have both, due to the subtitle issue) and listened to the English commentary.

Najemikon

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Re: Achim's entirely random reviews
« Reply #33 on: October 16, 2010, 02:11:25 PM »
I have a preview ticket for this on Monday. Shame about the door entry scene, because that defined the tone of the first film for me. And regards the CGI issue, if I remember correctly, wasn't Let The Right One In done with a combination if subtle CGI and even an older actress? Just for the briefest moments you see her as a grown woman which is very powerful. Tell me they at least kept that, because it's so important to the perception.

The saddest part of all this is the fact it's the first production of the new Hammer studio... I know it isn't the same Hammer (the talent isn't the same) but at least try to do something original worthy of the Hammer name.

You can't judge them on one film, Jimmy, and you have to remember how manipulative and cynical the movie business has to be. The truth is, they know doing a remake is an easy hook, especially combined with the studio name. It's guaranteed to garner more success than an original piece. But, fingers crossed this is successful, we will now get a string of very cool and brilliant horror movies, all with: "From the legendary studio that brought you Let Me In". ;)

To be fair, their website has info on a bunch of stuff coming up like: http://www.hammerfilms.com/productions/film/filmid/24/the-woman-in-black

And it seems a bit dishonest to moan about Hammer doing remakes when that's exactly how they started! :P

Offline Jimmy

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Re: Achim's entirely random reviews
« Reply #34 on: October 16, 2010, 04:46:30 PM »
And it seems a bit dishonest to moan about Hammer doing remakes when that's exactly how they started! :P
Not really...
Their first two films in 1935 (The Public Life of Henry the Ninth and The Mystery of the Marie Celeste) aren't remake and to be honest I don't consider their Dracula, Frankenstein or Mummy films to be remake but re-interpretation of old stories.

But their next production look more interesting ;D

The Resident
When a young doctor suspects she may not be alone in her new Brooklyn loft, she learns that her landlord has formed a frightening obsession with her.
(not that original, but that could be a good thriller since Hilary Swank is the lead and Christopher Lee is in it)

Offline Achim

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Re: Achim's entirely random reviews
« Reply #35 on: October 17, 2010, 02:58:15 PM »
I have a preview ticket for this on Monday. Shame about the door entry scene, because that defined the tone of the first film for me. And regards the CGI issue, if I remember correctly, wasn't Let The Right One In done with a combination if subtle CGI and even an older actress? Just for the briefest moments you see her as a grown woman which is very powerful. Tell me they at least kept that, because it's so important to the perception.
Having rewatched the original right the next day, I'll reconfirm that Let Me In is a very faithful remake.

The door entry scene is very similar as regards to the acting and the camera angles, it's just the music that ruins it. In fact, I had forgotten how little music there was in the original!

You remember the "face-moment" correct! It's mainly showing Eli with the face of an woman, rather than a demon like grimace (so, sorry, didn't keep it). Also, it's only done once in the original (the moment Matthias described) but twice in the remake (a first time is much earlier on, right after the first kill).

Offline Antares

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Re: Achim's entirely random reviews
« Reply #36 on: December 15, 2010, 06:16:29 AM »
Shame you didn't like Cinema Paradiso. You really should have read my review first where I recommend not watching the Director's Cut first... unfortunately, I think you've proved why. :slaphead:

http://www.dvdcollectorsonline.com/index.php/topic,5638.msg98404.html#msg98404

I don't know how I missed Achim's review, but I watched the DC, and haven't wanted to watch the theatrical release. I loved it completely, and it's number 9 on my Top Ten of all time.

Najemikon

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Re: Achim's entirely random reviews
« Reply #37 on: December 15, 2010, 08:46:08 PM »
The final act though is a challenging one, which the theatrical bypasses, because it asks the viewer to consider one of the characters in a different light and if the viewer isn't willing to, it can be a bit tough. The original cut is essentially another Shawshank effect; wonderful, but washes over you, while the DC is a proper film because it gets to the real truth of the story.

Offline Achim

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The Wages of Fear
« Reply #38 on: July 07, 2011, 03:15:19 PM »
     Le salaire de la peur (The Criterion Collection) (1953/France)

Janus Films, The Criterion Collection (United States)
Director:Henri-Georges Clouzot
Writing:Georges Arnaud (Original Material By), Henri-Georges Clouzot (Screenwriter), Jérôme Géronimi (Screenwriter)
Length:148 min.
Video:Full Frame 1.33:1
Audio:French: Dolby Digital: Mono
Subtitles:English

Stars:
Yves Montand as Mario
Charles Vanel as M. Jo
Peter van Eyck as Bimba
Folco Lulli as Luigi

Plot:
IN A SQUALID SOUTH AMERICAN OIL TOWN, four desperate men sign on for a suicide mission to drive trucks loaded with nitroglycerin over a treacherous mountain route. As they ferry their explosive cargo to a faraway oil fire, each bump and jolt tests their courage, their friendship, and their nerves. The result is one of the greatest thrillers ever committed to celluloid, a white-knuckle ride from France's legendary master of suspense, Henri-Georges Clouzot.

Extras:
  • Scene Access
  • Feature Trailers
  • Featurettes
  • Production Notes


My Thoughts:
The highly intense main section of the film is really great. The actors do great work to portray their respective roles. Despite the lack of music strong tension is achieved repeatedly and the simple threat of the nitro exploding from even a small vibration kept me on the edge of the seat for most of the time.

I really wanted to like this film more than I did. However, the two main character were rather unlikable to me which really put a bump in the road for me (pardon the pun). The second pair of characters (Luigi and Bimba) is what kept me engaged. On top of this I found the opening part of the film, which already made sure that I don't like the two main characters all that much, much too long (1 hour) and should have been trimmed by at least 30min (maybe I am just missing the point). And finally at the end...
(click to show/hide)

Offline Achim

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Reefer Madness [2005]
« Reply #39 on: July 24, 2011, 09:17:59 AM »
    Reefer Madness: The Movie Musical (2005/United States)
:dvd: (United States)
Director:Andy Fickman
Writing:Kevin Murphy (Screenwriter), Dan Studney (Screenwriter), Kevin Murphy (Original Material By), Dan Studney (Original Material By)
Length:108 min.
Video:Anamorphic Widescreen 1.78:1
Audio:English: Dolby Digital: 2-Channel Stereo, English: Dolby Digital: 5.1, Commentary: Dolby Digital: 2-Channel Stereo
Subtitles:

Stars:
Kristen Bell as Mary Lane
Christian Campbell as Jimmy Harper
Neve Campbell as Miss Poppy
Alan Cumming as Lecturer/Goat-Man/FDR
Ana Gasteyer as Mae Coleman

Plot:
Inspired by the legendary 1936 film of the same name, 'Reefer Madness' is a tongue-in-cheek raucous musical comedy about clean-cut kids who fall into a twisted, hilarious downward spiral of reefer, sex and mayhem! A straight-laced high school lecturer (Alan Cumming) seeks to impart his wisdom to frightened parents about the "demon weed" by telling the frightful tale of two innocent teens. Mary Lane (Kristen Bell) and Jimmy Harper (Christian Campbell), who fall under the spell of the public's enemy #1 and quickly find themselves in a world of evil jazz music, dance and madness. Filled with outrageously funny and musical performances by Neve Campbell, Christian Campbell, Kristen Bell and Steven Weber, 'Reefer Madness' is the feel good event of the year that should not be missed!

Extras:
  • Scene Access
  • Audio Commentary
  • Feature Trailers
  • Featurettes
  • Gallery
  • Production Notes
  • Closed Captioned
  • Original 1936 black & white film included


My Thoughts:
This is a bit of a strange movie. On the one hand, it's a fun musical with an over-the-top story and the acting that comes with that. But one can't really help but wonder "why are they doing this, why are they trying to tell me Marihuana is worse than heroin, even if they don't seem serious about it". Luckily this DVD comes with the original 1936 (the originally "educational" film Tell Your Children had been spiced up and exploited for its comedic effects) and a short featurette explaining some additional background. So, on the other hand it's somewhat of a remake with some musical numbers thrown in and turn the farcical elements way up where the 1936 version merely expanded on the existing footage.

It's a fun comedic musical with a few of the numbers going way beyond the source material (the scene where Mary smokes and is seduced and of course the scene in the church with Jesus). They added one element which I am a little torn over, which is the character Sally having a baby and neglecting it through her drug abuse; this may have been inspired by Trainspotting, in which the scene fit, here not really so much.

Rating:

Offline Achim

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Battle Beyond the Stars
« Reply #40 on: December 25, 2011, 06:47:20 AM »

     Battle Beyond the Stars (Roger Corman's Cult Classics) (1980/United States)
:blu:Shout! Factory (United States)
Director:Jimmy T. Murakami
Writing:John Sayles (Screenwriter), John Sayles (Story By), Anne Dyer (Story By)
Length:103 min.
Video:Widescreen 1.85:1
Audio:English: DTS-HD Master Audio: 5.1, English: Dolby Digital: 2-Channel Stereo, Commentary: Dolby Digital: 2-Channel Stereo, Commentary: Dolby Digital: 2-Channel Stereo
Subtitles:

Stars:
Richard Thomas as Shad
Robert Vaughn as Gelt
John Saxon as Sador
George Peppard as Cowboy
Darlanne Fluegel as Nanelia
Sybil Danning as St. Exmin

Plot:
Shad (Richard Thomas) must scour the cosmos to recruit mercenaries from different planets and cultures in order to save his peaceful home planet from the threat of the evil tyrant Sador (John Saxon), who's bent on dominating and enslaving the entire universe. Joining this "magnificent seven" of mercenaries are the deadly Gelt (Robert Vaughn), carefree Cowboy (George Peppard) and the sexy Valkyrie Saint-Exmin (Sybil Danning).

The film brought together some extremely talented people behind the scenes who went on to bigger and better things: Academy Award®-winning director James Cameron as the art director, Academy Award®-winning composer James Horner (Titanic, Avatar), screenwriter John Sayles (Lone Star, Piranha) adn producer Gale Anne Hurd (Terminator, The Incredible Hulk) as an assistant production manager.

Extras:
  • Audio Commentary
  • Feature Trailers
  • Featurettes
  • Gallery
  • Interviews
  • Radio Spot


My Thoughts:
There are movies which I prefer to watch in the evening and there are those that I think are great for afternoons. I started watching Battle Beyond the Stars on a Saturday night and it just didn't feel right. Eventually I started nodding off and decided to turn it off. The next day I came back to it during the afternoon and it was great fun! Of the four Roger Corman science fiction films I have seen recently (this as well as Forbidden Planet, Galaxy of Terror and Star Crash) this one has the most production values.

The story borrows heavily from The Seven Samurai while trying to cash in on the wake of Star Wars' success. Some of the art direction a bit off the wall (like the space ship that looks like having boobs) and the use of an "earthling" makes for a few moments that take you out of the movie (the talk of Western movies and the character drinking whiskey with soda and ice feels strongly out of place among the alien races). But there is also a few fun ideas being placed with, like the two aliens that communicate via heat or the other race that feels and thinks "as one" (an idea that I saw drawn from in the video game Mass Effect 2).

The special effects are more than just competent (considering this was made on a Roger Corman budget), the acting is fine and as you'd expect in a B-movie like this, yet no one is overdoing it, not even John Saxon in the role of the villain, which he could easily have been tempted to do.

So, while not really great for a Saturday night at the movies this is a fun flick to be enjoyed on a lazy Sunday afternoon.

Rating: (a strong)