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Member's Reviews

The Films of Budd Boetticher, a review by Antares


The Films of Budd Boetticher



The Films of Budd BoetticherThe Tall T

Year: 1957
Film Studio: Columbia Pictures, Producers-Actors Corporation
Genre: Western
Length: 77 Min.

Director
Budd Boetticher (1916)

Writing
Elmore Leonard (1925)...Story
Burt Kennedy (1922)...Screenplay

Producer
Harry Joe Brown (1890)
Randolph Scott (1898)

Cinematographer
Charles Lawton Jr. (1904)

Music
Heinz Roemheld (1901)...Composer

Stars
Randolph Scott (1898) as Pat Brennan
Richard Boone (1917) as Frank Usher
Maureen O'Sullivan (1911) as Doretta Mims
Arthur Hunnicutt (1910) as Ed Rintoon
Skip Homeier (1930) as Billy Jack
Henry Silva (1928) as Chink
John Hubbard (1914) as Willard Mims
Robert Burton (1895) as Tenvoorde

Review
       The first film in the set is the second pairing by Boetticher and Scott, a deep, rich character study called The Tall TRatings Criterion4 Stars - Historically important film, considered a classic.Decision at Sundown

Year: 1957
Film Studio: Columbia Pictures
Genre: Western
Length: 77 Min.

Director
Budd Boetticher (1916)

Writing
Charles Lang (1915)...Screenplay
Vernon L. Fluharty...Story

Producer
Harry Joe Brown (1890)
Randolph Scott (1898)

Cinematographer
Burnett Guffey (1905)

Music
Heinz Roemheld (1901)...Composer

Stars
Randolph Scott (1898) as Bart Allison
John Carroll (1906) as Tate Kimbrough
Karen Steele (1931) as Lucy Summerton
Valerie French (1928) as Ruby James
Noah Beery Jr. (1913) as Sam
John Archer (1915) as Dr. John Storrow
Andrew Duggan (1923) as Sheriff Swede Hansen
James Westerfield (1913) as Otis, the Bartender

Review
       The next film in the set deviates slightly from the normal setting of a Boetticher/Scott film. Whereas most of the films take place out on the open range, Decision at SundownRatings CriterionBuchanan Rides Alone

Year: 1958
Film Studio: Columbia Pictures
Genre: Western
Length: 79 Min.

Director
Budd Boetticher (1916)

Writing
Charles Lang (1915)...Screenplay
Jonas Ward...Novel "The Name's Buchanan"

Producer
Harry Joe Brown (1890)
Randolph Scott (1898)

Cinematographer
Lucien Ballard (1908)

Music


Stars
Randolph Scott (1898) as Tom Buchanan
Craig Stevens (1918) as Abe Carbo
Barry Kelley (1908) as Lew Agry
Tol Avery (1915) as Judge Simon Agry
Peter Whitney (1916) as Amos Agry
Manuel Rojas as Juan de la Vega
L. Q. Jones (1927) as Pecos Hill
Robert Anderson (1923) as Waldo Peck

Review
       Once again the setting is a small town, but this time the town is run by a group of corrupt brothers who turn on each other in the name of greed. Agrytown is on the border with Mexico, and from the moment that Tom Buchanan (Scott) rides in, he knows that he must keep his wits about him. Unfortunately, he helps the son of a powerful Mexican landowner who has killed the son of the town judge, Simon Agry. With the sheriff being Lew Agry, the deck is decidedly stacked against both Buchanan and the Mexican. At his trial, Buchanan is surprisingly acquitted by the judge, but all of his money is taken and he is Ratings CriterionRide Lonesome

Year: 1959
Film Studio: Columbia Pictures, Ranown Pictures
Genre: Western
Length: 73 Min.

Director
Budd Boetticher (1916)

Writing
Burt Kennedy (1922)...Written By

Producer
Budd Boetticher (1916)
Harry Joe Brown (1890)

Cinematographer
Charles Lawton Jr. (1904)

Music
Heinz Roemheld (1901)...Composer

Stars
Randolph Scott (1898) as Ben Brigade
Karen Steele (1931) as Mrs. Carrie Lane
Pernell Roberts (1928) as Sam Boone
James Best (1926) as Billy John
Lee Van Cleef (1925) as Frank
James Coburn (1928) as Whit

Review
       The last two films in this wonderful set are where the cream rises to the top. Ride Lonesome and Comanche Station are brilliant examples of movie making which melds the great aspects of a film together; Screenplay, acting, cinematography and direction. Set in the wilds of Arizona, Ride LonesomeRatings Criterion4 Stars - Historically important film, considered a classic.Comanche Station

Year: 1960
Film Studio: Columbia Pictures, Ranown Pictures
Genre: Western
Length: 73 Min.

Director
Budd Boetticher (1916)

Writing
Burt Kennedy (1922)...Written By

Producer
Budd Boetticher (1916)
Harry Joe Brown (1890)

Cinematographer
Charles Lawton Jr. (1904)

Music


Stars
Randolph Scott (1898) as Jefferson Cody
Nancy Gates (1926) as Nancy Lowe
Claude Akins (1926) as Ben Lane
Skip Homeier (1930) as Frank
Richard Rust (1938) as Dobie
Rand Brooks (1918) as Station Man
Dyke Johnson as John Lowe

ReviewRatings Criterion4 Stars - Historically important film, considered a classic.

(From The Films of Budd Boetticher on January 18th, 2010)

Member's Reviews

Mahanagar, a review by Antares


Mahanagar (1963) 95/100 -

"Not to have seen the cinema of Satyajit Ray means existing in the world without seeing the sun or the moon." - Akira Kurosawa

I guess until today, I've never seen the sun or the moon. This is my first film by Satyajit Ray, and while it's only my first, I have to wonder if my favorite director of all time was right. At around the ten minute mark, there's a scene where Arati, who's in bed with her husband, tells him while he's half sleeping, that she will try to find work to help with the family's financial situation. There's a sense of pride in her eyes, and a new found confidence in her demeanor, that you can't help but want to see her succeed. Then, just a few minutes later, Ray shifts the focus to the other end of the emotional spectrum, to a scene where the son tells the father that his daughter-in-law is getting a job. In the span of a brief few minutes, you see the son's embarrassment when he tells his father the news that Arati has found work, juxtaposing it with the guilt and shame that the father feels for being a burden to the family. What makes this scene so powerful is the subtle way that Ray shoots it. The son is off screen, giving his father the news, all the while admitting to his fault at not being able to provide for the whole family. While the son is talking, the camera stays focused on the father's face as Ray slowly and softly, moves into a close up of the father. As the tears start to trickle down the old man's face, you sense a realization that he and his wife are a burden, and have nothing left to offer this world. The pain is painted across his weathered features and he looks down deflated and defeated. In just a few short scenes, Ray runs the gamut from self-confidence, to guilt, to worthlessness. The film really hits its stride when events transpire that put Arati in the role of sole provider for the family. The anguish that the husband feels, coinciding with a simmering jealousy that's boiling just below his emotional surface. Can his pride survive against the progression of time and its changing social structure? In the end, Arati will make a decision which will show her integrity, but may lead to harder times for the family. A somewhat ambiguous ending, but the whole film is done with such craftsmanship that it's pretty close to a work of art. An amazing film that registers so many emotions, on so many levels. I highly recommend this film.

What the color coding means...

Teal = Masterpiece
Dark Green = Classic or someday will be
Lime Green = A good, entertaining film
Orange = Average
Red = Cinemuck
Brown = The color of crap, which this film is


(From Antares' Short Summations on April 2nd, 2014)

Member's TV Reviews

Tom's Random Reviews, a review by Tom


     The Office: Season Seven (2010/United States)
IMDb | Wikipedia

Universal Studios Home Entertainment (United States)
Director:
Writing:
Length:586 min.
Video:Anamorphic Widescreen 1.78
Audio:English: Dolby Digital 5.1
Subtitles:English, Spanish

Stars:


Plot:VarietyGone Baby Gone), a cameo from Ricky Gervais (The Invention of Lying) and an unforgettable hour-long season finale with Jim Carrey (Bruce Almighty), Will Arnett (Arrested Development), Ray Romano (Everybody Loves Raymond), James Spader (Boston Legal) and Catherine Tate (Doctor Who), all vying for Michael Scott's old post. Plus, see hours of bonus features, including extended episodes, deleted scenes, bloopers, webisodes and more, in this must-own five-disc collection.

Awards:
Won:
Primetime Emmy Awards (2009)  Outstanding Directing for a Comedy Series ("Stress Relief": Jeffrey Blitz)
Nominated:
Golden Globe (2009)  Actor - Television Comedy or Musical Series (Steve Carell)
Golden Globe (2010)  Best Performance by an Actor In A Television Series - Comedy Or Musical (Steve Carell)
Golden Globe (2009)  Television Series - Musical or Comedy
Primetime Emmy Awards (2009)  Outstanding Comedy Series
Primetime Emmy Awards (2010)  Outstanding Comedy Series
Primetime Emmy Awards (2009)  Outstanding Lead Actor in a Comedy Series (Steve Carell)
Primetime Emmy Awards (2010)  Outstanding Lead Actor In A Comedy Series ("The Cover Up": Steve Carell)
Primetime Emmy Awards (2009)  Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Comedy Series (Rainn Wilson)
Primetime Emmy Awards (2010)  Outstanding Writing for a Comedy Series ("Niagara": Greg Daniels, Mindy Kaling)
Teen Choice Awards (2009)  Choice TV Actor - Comedy (Steve Carell)
Teen Choice Awards (2009)  Choice TV Actress - Comedy (Jenna Fisher)
Teen Choice Awards (2009)  Choice TV Show: Comedy

Extras:
  • Bonus Trailers
  • Commentary
  • Deleted Scenes
  • Featurettes
  • Outtakes
  • Webisodes


My Thoughts:
This season had a slow start, but it turned out great again. This is the season where Steve Carell left the show towards the end. The storyline they have given him to write him out of the show was the right way to go.
Also Ricky Gervais finally made two cameo appearances this season as David Brent. In the first he ran across Michael Scott and was joking with him.
The second was a Video CV where he applies for the manager job after Michael Scott left. I would have liked him interacting with the complete Office cast though.
Will Ferrell had a few episodes where he had taken over from Michael. He did a good job.
Sadly Pam and Jim didn't get a good storyline this season. I always liked their scenes together.

#EpisodeRating
01Nepotism
02Counseling
03Andy's Play
04Sex Ed
05The Sting
06Costume Contest
07Christening
08Viewing Party
09WUPHF.com
10China
11Classy Christmas
12Ultimatum
13The Seminar
14The Search
15PDA
16Threat Level Midnight
17Todd Packer
18Garage Sale
19Training Day
20Michael's Last Dundies
21Goodbye Michael
22The Inner Circle
23Dwight K. Schrute, (Acting) Manager
24Search Committee


(From Tom's Random Reviews on September 3rd, 2011)